Andrew Dignan trials enthusiast

The Scottish trials world was saddened by the news that Lochaber man, Andrew Dignan, father of trials riding sons David, Kevin and Simon, passed away on Thursday 19th July, 2018.

Andrew for many years, with his wife Grace, were stalwarts of the Lochaber & District MCC and  after Grace’s death in 2001, the club has run an event in her memory every year since.

Andrew was a well-known face in the parc ferme at the Scottish Six Days Trial as well as being the final time control official at the annual highland event.

Trials Guru’s John Moffat said: “Andrew Dignan was a man who always met you with a cheery smile and a good firm handshake. He was a true trials enthusiast who never competed but put a lot into the sport, having observed and officiated at the SSDT and local trials which he helped organise with his wife Grace.”

Moffat continued: “On a personal note, I had a lot of time for Andrew and we could chat for many hours when we met. I valued his friendship highly and I will miss him greatly”.

Andrew’s funeral will take place at Noon on Saturday, 28th July 2018 at St Margaret’s Church in Roy Bridge, near Fort William. No flowers are requested, but there will be a collection for the local Belford Hospital – Ward One, endowment fund.

We send our sincere condolences to the Dignan family.

Photo courtesy of the Dignan family

Scott open for business

Entries for the 2018 Scott Trial, to be held Saturday 13th October 2018 are now officially open.

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Entry Form’s and official regulations are now available to download from the Richmond Motor Club website under ‘Scott Trial 2018 -Regs’ and ‘Scott Trial 2018 Entry Form’

Richmond Motor Club website Link

The organisers ask that you please read the regulations carefully before filling in the entry form to make sure that you enter for all the correct awards.

Entries for the toughest trial in the UK are on a ‘first come, first served’ basis and the entries will close on Friday, 2nd September 2018. The entries are limited to 200 riders, so get your entry forms in as soon as possible to guarantee your place!

Any businesses who may wish to take up advertising space should contact the programme editor by e-mail: scotttrialeditor@outlook.com as soon as possible as the advertising space is almost full, with full page adverts fully booked, but a few half page are still available, at the reasonable cost of £50.00.

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Something a little different

Trials Guru is of course all about the sport of trials, but its’ creator, John Moffat is interested in all forms of motorcycle sport, that includes Motocross.

John was invited to get a ‘bit involved’ in the recent Drumlanrig Grand National Motocross on the weekend of 13-15th July, 2018.

Held in the grounds of the majestic Drumlanrig Castle in Dumfries and Galloway, the stately home of the Duke of Buccleuch, the event was very well supported and is becoming the premier motocross event in Scotland.

It was promoted and organised by the re-formed and locally based Galloway Motorcycle Club, which was a club that had started out in the 1930s and folded around 2011. The good news is that it is back up and running again, affiliated to the Scottish ACU and headed up by Fraser Dykes (Chairman) and Willie Brown (Secretary) and has a strong nucleus of committee members, all willing to get their hands dirty.

Moffat’s remit was to conduct a full hour-long interview on the Friday evening with the 1982 World 500cc Motocross Champion, Brad Lackey who kept the audience spell-bound with his recounts of his life in professional motocross as a factory rider for CZ, Kawasaki, Honda and Suzuki.

Moffat also hosted the ‘Galloway Gathering’ on the Saturday night which saw many former Scottish Motocross riders and champions being interviewed to keep the crowd both intertained and informed. This was all done in a massive marquee on site.

Here are some photos taken during the three day event, courtesy of former Trials & Motocross News reporter, Graham Milne which gives a flavour of what Trials Guru had been getting up to at Drumlanrig!

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World 500cc Motocross Champion in 1982 was Suzuki’s Brad Lackey, here talking to Trials Guru at Drumlanrig – Photo: Graham Milne

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Billy Edwards on the left was a former Bultaco, CCM, Kawasaki and Maico rider… and oh yes he was Scottish Motocross Champion in 1979. Photo: Graham Milne

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Vic Allan (left) was double British Motocross Champion 250/500cc in 1974 on Bultaco Pursangs – Photo: Graham Milne

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Roy Black Jnr (left) was both Junior and Senior Scottish Motocross Champion in successive years, the only rider to achieve this on Maico – Photo: Graham Milne

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Brad Lackey tells John Moffat exactly how he won the 1982 World 500cc Motocross Championship for Suzuki, a ten year ‘journey’ – Photo: Graham Milne

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Photo: Graham Milne

 

Reeth Three Day 2018 cancelled

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The annual Reeth Three Day Trial scheduled to begin on July 20th and organized by the Richmond Motor Club (Yorkshire) has had to be cancelled due the risk of moorland fires this year.

Dry weather during June and more similar warm, dry weather forecast leading up to the event has made the moorland on which the trial is run, tinder dry and the risk of fire possible.

The ever responsible Richmond Motor Club took the weighty decision to cancel the very popular and over-subscribed event, as it depends on the good working relationship with landowners, game-keepers, factors and farmers in the vast landscape in the which the club organizes its events, including the famous Scott Trial in October.

The Reeth Three Day was an idea put forward many years ago by local enthusiast and life-long club member, the late David ‘Tubby’ Allinson of Reeth who wanted to create a mini SSDT. Over the years it has been a great success and well supported.

The Richmond club did not take the decision lightly as the event attracts 200 competitors and takes a great deal of effort to organize, but it did not wish to put ground at risk now and in the future if a fire was to break out during the event for whatever reason.

The First American

Mike McCabe was the first American competitor to enter the Scottish Six Days Trial in 1972.

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Here is his recount, in his own words, of his Highland Adventure, riding a Sammy Miller supplied Bultaco Sherpa T.

“The most fun, but maybe the most scary thing I’ve ever done” – Mike McCabe

The road to Scotland

In the late 60’s and early 70’s, the Spanish factories that made trials bikes were sending their sponsored riders to the United States to put on trials schools and promote trials as well as their bikes. In 1968 the first trials school I knew about was Sammy Miller’s, for Bultaco, in St. Louis. I managed to get an entry, and went with one of my riding friends, ‘Doober’ Dotson. I rode a Greeves and ‘Doober’ rode a Penton.

The school was on Saturday, and then there was a trials event on Sunday. For some reason, we had to be back in Tulsa on the Sunday and couldn’t stay for the trial.   After the school, I asked Sammy Miller what I could do to improve my riding – “Get a Bultaco” he said. So, just as soon as I could, I bought my first Sherpa T.

In 1969, I heard about another school and trial being put on by Mick Andrews for Ossa in Columbia, Missouri. So off we went – same deal, school Saturday, trial Sunday.  I lucked out and won the trial, and got a trophy from Mick, which I still have.  Fast forward to the year 1970 and Mick is back for another school. Again, I won the trial, and also became better acquainted with him.  We started communicating by mail and the occasional phone call.

In 1971, the North Eastern Oklahoma Trials Team (NEOTT) decided to have Mick do a school here in Tulsa. Everything got arranged and while Mick was in New England getting ready to compete in the SSDT when he broke his shoulder. They called to say he couldn’t do our school, as he was looking for someone to operate on his shoulder. Well, I had just had my first knee surgery and suggested my doctor.  After talking to Doctor Myra Peters, she agreed to see Mick.  The Ossa factory rep, Roy Weaver, drove Mick and his wife, Jill, down to Tulsa where his shoulder was repaired.  He couldn’t travel for a few weeks, so he stayed with us in Tulsa and it was during this stay that he first suggested that I might like to ride the SSDT  – see, all that long winded story did lead to my going to the 1972 SSDT.

Logistics:

My wife, Carroll, as usual, was super supportive and we began to try to figure how to do it. I had to get an entry and an International competition license, both which were difficult to do – another story there.  Then, how to pay for the trip, how to get a bike and so on. Sammy Miller agreed to rent me a Bultaco for about $90.00 for the week, and it turned out to be the bike he had just won the British National Championship on, with registration number COT 6K.

At that time, you had to arrange for your own fuel and support for the event. At the time, one of my riding buddies was Kirk Mayfield and I talked his Dad into letting Kirk go with me to Scotland. The plan was for Kirk to chase the trial in a car with gas and supplies for me. Nowadays the entry fee includes all your fuel, and the fuel stops are manned by the British Army.

So off we went to London where my friend, Tony Bentley who was also the subscription manager for the English motorcycle newspaper I subscribed to, met us at the airport and kindly put us up for a couple of nights. Tony also arranged for a rental car – a Hillman Hunter estate car. The first couple of days in London, Tony took us around to all the motorcycle shops we’d heard of and read about.

One of the shops was the official Bultaco importer for England, Comerfords at Thames Ditton, Surrey. This is where I really got lucky.  We met Peter ‘Jock’ Wilson, their Bultaco UK manager, who was also going to manage their SSDT team.  Their team was sponsored by Castrol Oils, who were doing all their gas stops and support.  So Jock got me sponsored by Castrol, which enabled me to get fuel etc. at all their stops.  So that let Kirk Mayfield skip every other fueling stop, and made it way easier for us to stay on time. (Note: You are allowed to be one hour late/per day – more than an hour late and you are excluded, so staying on the route, and assigned time is a big deal.)

We then went down to the South coast of England to Sammy Miller’s shop to prepare the bike. We took it apart, stuffed it in the back of the little station wagon, and drove ten hours up to Scotland.  Considering that we were driving on the wrong side of the road, completely lost most of the time, it was fairly uneventful except for the time in the middle of the night when Kirk fell asleep while driving – I was asleep in the back, with the motorcycle, when things started flying around – we both woke up in the center median going the right way, so we just went on – how do we survive our youth?

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In 1972 the trial started in Edinburgh at Gorgie Market and then was centered for the rest of the week in Fort William. So we got to Edinburgh, went through tech inspection and found the hotel Mick Andrews had arranged for us and got ready for the big adventure!

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Mike McCabe leaving the SSDT start area in 1973 at Edinburgh’s Gorgie Market. The venue is still there being a night-club, ‘Corn Exchange’ and recreation area today. He was to encounter snow at the ‘Edramucky’ group of sections a few hours later!

 

Monday morning, and off I go, riding through the huge city of Edinburgh, in traffic, on the wrong side of the road, over The Forth Road Bridge and out into the country side, finally getting to ride some sections.

The weather was dry and lucky for me, the trial that week was mostly good weather. The first days’ route was 160 miles and 24 sections, mostly road riding and fairly easy sections.

But that didn’t last very long – the rest of the week was much harder and the whole trial comprised of 749 miles and 161 sections.

By Thursday morning when I got ready to go out my clothes and boots were soaking wet and I was tired and sore and I thought “What have I gotten myself into?” But, knowing that I was also the first American to compete in the SSDT, I was determined NOT to be the first American to DNF.  Thursday evening the town of Fort William puts on a street party for the riders and fans – really great fun and a break from the almost constant riding and working on the bike.

Finally, the last day and the long ride back to Edinburgh, with sections all along the way – and to the finish: probably the most anti-climactic part of the whole trial. Just ride in to the finish, they check your bike to see if all the marked parts are still there, and it’s over.

Kirk and I drove back down the whole length of England, returned the bike to Sammy’s shop, Tony took us to the airport and we flew home. A few weeks later my finishers’ award came in the mail.

1973 – Do it again – bring some friends

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The SSDT 1973 with (from left) Rodger Bickham, (Ossa); Kirk Mayfield (Ossa) and Mike McCabe (Bultaco). The Castrol Range Rover (GTX1K) which promoted Castrol GTX lube is also in the photo.

After a year of rest and lots of fun memories, I decided to do it again in 1973.

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Excerpt from the 1973 SSDT official programme showing the Team listings.

 

This time Kirk was old enough to get an International license, another friend, Rodger Bickham from Kansas wanted to ride, so off we went – we were actually officially listed in the program as the North Eastern Oklahoma Trials Team, so we finally got to live up to our name as a ‘Trials Team’.  Also, in 1973 there were seven Americans entered – but that’s another story …

Special thanks to Mike Wm. McCabe for allowing Trials Guru to use his article which first appeared on the NEOTT website in the USA.

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Inch Perfect open for business

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The go-ahead dealership Inch Perfect Trials throws its doors open on Saturday 9th June to welcome customers, past and present to see what the inovative company has to offer.

The location is New Hey Barn, Whitewell, near Clitheroe, Lancashire BB7 3AU and the opening hours between 8am and 4 pm.

Managing Director Matthew Alpe, himself a successful trials rider looks forward to welcoming you to the new showroom.

Inch Perfect Trials offers machine sales, training, parts and accessories and experience days as part of its business plan, unique in the trials world in the UK.

The website is: www.inchperfecttrials.co.uk for more details.

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